5 Best Japanese Chef Knives Under $100 (Reviews Updated 2022)

Japanese Chef Knives are some of the top-rated kitchen knives out there. Outstanding for sharpness, quality, and durability; Japanese blades are much lighter than those from Europe thanks to their less brittle steel that holds a keen edge for years. And if you’re looking to purchase one without breaking the bank – what you really need is research and patience to find one within your budget. Lucky for you – we’ve compiled a collection of some of the best chef’s knives costing below $100 which will suit both beginners and professionals alike!

Best Japanese Chef Knives Under $100

Shun Sora Chef’s Knife

You can never go wrong with acquiring an Shun Sora chef’s knife – it is the end-all be-all for any avid cook. Its beauty transcends its utility and it makes anything you make turn out professional quality. Why? It has everything from built-in sharpness from a 420 Japanese carbon steel, which holds its edge well even through long use, to excellent sturdiness due to a VG-10 Stainless Steel clad on both sides of this little chef’s friend. And what do people notice first when they see someone wielding an unmatched bladed beauty? The darling textured TPE rubber handle, crafted by skilled hands in Japan itself that feels soft yet sturdy in hand. A cheap knife may do the job right now but there will come a time when it won’t suffice anymore and at that moment, all you’ll need is an Akira Koki kai Sheath Black Shun Knife Set (better known as Shinji).

Why do we enjoy it so much?

  • Designed and Made in Japan
  • Core Cutters VG-10
  • Handle with TPE Texture
  • blade edge that isn’t serrated

FAMCÜTE 8 Inch Japanese Chef Knife

FAMCÜTE Japanese Chef Knife is the best choice when you want a Japanese knife that will last and won’t break the bank. This chef’s knife is light and about eight inches long. The blade is made of alloy steel, which doesn’t rust or tarnish. The handle of this knife is made of African Rosewood and is all natural. Even though it is very good, this chef’s knife is very cheap and only costs about $50.

The FAMCÜTE Japanese Chef Knife is great for slicing, mincing, dicing, chopping, and chopping small things. Aside from frozen foods, this chef’s knife is great for cutting meat, fish, vegetables, and fruits. Its ergonomic design makes it easy to use, comfortable, and easy to move around. The balance point of this knife runs from the heel to the spine, which makes it easy to hold on to and helps you make cuts that last.

Mercer Culinary Genesis Forged Santoku Knife

Since its release, the Mercer Culinary Genesis Forged Santoku Knife has become a staple in kitchens around. You won’t experience any discomfort even if your hands are covered in cooking oil because this knife’s grip is so comfortable.

The Santoprene handle has been meticulously manufactured and intended to provide a firm grip. You can now cut an infinite number of fruits and veggies without fatigue.

Whether you’re a seasoned cook or just looking for a Japanese knife for your kitchen, this is the ideal option. Besides being inexpensive, this is one of the most coveted chef’s knives. Boning out chicken meat, dicing and slicing fruits, and chopping veggies were never so simple until this new kitchen aid.

NSF certification ensures that it will last for a long time. Rust, corrosion, and discoloration are no match for the German high-carbon stainless steel used in this knife.

Tojiro DP Gyuto (210 mm)

The Tojiro DP is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most popular Japanese kitchen knives available at the beginner level. It also costs less than $100. Snag one while you can, because the price seems to be increasing (perhaps due to its increasing popularity).

The triple-layered stainless steel blade on the Tojiro DP gyuto has a Western-style wooden handle. Sharpening and maintaining the blade is made easier because the outside layer of the blade is made of a softer steel and the inner core is made of a hard stainless steel (VG-10). The Rockwood hardness scale gives the blade a 60 HRC rating. For such a cheap knife, it’s surprisingly tough.

This knife can be used by both right- and left-handed people since the blade edge is symmetrical. All fundamental cutting techniques can be used with ease due to the blade profile and overall balance. You don’t have to spend any time sharpening it when you get it because it’s already sharp. It’s time to start chopping.

The Tojiro DP gyuto’s weight (180 grams, 6.3 ounces) is a minor drawback when compared to other similarly sized Japanese knives. If you’re used to Western products, this one will still feel lighter than most of them.

All things considered, this is one of the greatest Japanese chef knives available. A good gyuto to get started with is this one, and you won’t be disappointed. The Tojiro DP 210mm variant costs little over $80 at the time of this writing, however the price seems to rise slightly on a regular basis. In addition, there is now a 180mm and a 240mm variant available for less than $100.

Fuji Narihira Chef’s Knife (210mm)

Another frequently suggested Japanese chef’s knife, the Fuji Narihira gyuto, is considerably less expensive than the Tojiro. There are several blade sizes available, and they all sell for less than $100 USD – currently under $50 for the 210mm!

Fuji Cutlery, the parent firm of the Tojiro brand knives, also makes the Narihira brand of knives. A decent knife from this manufacturer, known for creating excellent low-end Japanese kitchen knives, is a given. Why is the Tojiro DP more expensive than the Fuji Narihira DP?

Blade material and construction make the biggest difference between the two. The Narihira employs Molybdenum-Vanadium (MV) stainless steel in a pressed mono-steel (single piece) structure, whereas the Tojiro DP uses VG-10 stainless steel in a triple layer. Because of the lower cost of the steel and the construction technology, the product can be sold at a lower price. Additionally, the MV steel is slightly softer than VG-10 (58 HRC), thus it will wear out more quickly. You don’t have to bother about sharpening the knife right away because it’s already razor-sharp out of the box.

The Narihira brand knives are also less expensive because they are mostly made in China and then sent to Japan for final quality control and polishing. This may annoy some people, but it’s the only way the price can be so low. Also, the majority of iPhones are made in China, and then examined by Apple before they are shipped. If you’re going to accept it as such, then so be it.

The Fuji Narihira is a great chef’s knife for the money, and it’s available for under $100. The shorter 21cm model costs about $50, while the longer 24cm model costs about $60. The Fuji Narihira is a good option if you’re on a low budget but yet want a high-quality gyuto.

Dalstrong Phantom Series knife – Japanese High-Carbon

Is sushi your thing? When the fillets don’t cut exactly as you want, things can become a little messy. You may rest easy knowing that DALSTRONG Phantom Series is here to take care of everything.

Perfect and smooth precision cuts are what you can expect from the best DALSTRONG Phantom Series – Japanese High-Carbon 9.5 inch knife.

As a result of the sharpened and hand-polished blades, every sushi-quality fillet is ready to eat. The handle is composed of black velvet Spanish pakka wood, which is considered one of the greatest materials for providing a wonderful grip. –

Curved to exactly fit your hand, it is laminated and handmade. The blade is adorned with a mosaic brass pin that adds to the opulent feel when you’re using it.

The best sushi knife under $100 comes with a lifetime warranty and a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

MAC Chef Series HB-85 Gyuto ( 215mm / 8.5″ )

It is a well-known and highly regarded Japanese knife company recognized for producing high-quality, super-sharp blades that are utilized by both professional chefs and household cooks alike.

MAC’s HB-85 gyuto chef knife retails for about $82.50, making it one of the most cheap alternatives available. In addition to being the lightest chef’s knife in the MAC line, it weighs just 4.9oz (139 grams). When compared to the Tojiro DP, which has a comparable length, but a weight of 180 grams, this is noticeably lighter.

The HB-85’s minimal weight is mostly attributable to the blade’s incredibly thin profile. Compared to many other manufacturers, the edge of the blade is sharpened at a significantly more acute 15 degrees, rather than the customary 18-20 degrees. All MAC knives have this trademark razor-sharp edge, which distinguishes them from many of their competitors.

The MAC knife’s rust-resistant Molybdenum steel alloy makes it resistant to chipping, despite the knife’s thin edge. When compared to most German/Western-made knives, the hardness of the steel (58-60 HRC) helps it retain its sharpness for a longer period of time.

Additionally, the handle does not have a bolster that connects it to the blade, which reduces the knife’s weight. Pakkawood (an engineered/composite wood) is used for the handle’s simple Western form. However, despite its lackluster appearance, the grip is sturdy and ideal for daily use.

There is a little drawback to this knife: the blade is slightly shorter than typical (1.63′′ / 41.4mm). When cutting, you will have less knuckle clearance if you have large hands. When compared to the Tojiro DP (43.7mm) and the Fuji Narihira, for example (46mm).

To sum it up, for the price of $82.50, the MAC HB-85 is a fantastic entry-level Japanese chef’s knife.

Ikkaku Donryu Molybdenum Gyuto (210mm)

Japanese chef’s knives don’t get much better than this for those just starting out in the kitchen. In fact, at the time of this writing it was only $54!

Rust-resistant Molybdenum Vanadium steel is used for the blade. This is a more affordable and softer steel (56 HRC) than most Japanese blades, which helps keep the price down. Even so, you can expect it to be harder and sharper than many common German or Western-made knives on the market today. A newbie or someone who uses their knives harshly may benefit from the softer steel, which is easier to sharpen and less likely to chip.

It weighs just 4.96 oz, making it one of the lightest knives available (140grams). Weight-wise, it’s about the same as the MAC HB-85 we described earlier. For everyday use, a lightweight knife is preferable because it will require less effort to wield than a heavier one (as long as you keep the blade sharp).

Another unusual feature of this knife is the 60/40 angle ratio of the blade bevel. Right-handed users will benefit more from the blade’s steeper angle on one side than on the other. However, if you are a lefty, this is plainly a disadvantage.

Another minor drawback of the Ikkaku Donryu is its POM resin handle (i.e a hard plastic). If you’re concerned about ruining a beautiful hardwood handle, this is a good option.

At $55, the Ikkaku Donryu is a wonderful entry-level Japanese chef’s knife for individuals who want to get their feet wet with Japanese cuisine. Longer sizes are also offered for less than $100.

Shun Sora Chef’s Knife

A sharp knife is all you need if you enjoy cooking. Let us know what you think. Shun Sora’s Chef’s Knife is completely within your reach and won’t put a dent in your wallet. This knife is renowned for its exceptional build quality and cutting-edge functionality, and for good reason.

Cut every seasonal fruit and vegetable without damaging the flavor or freshness with this beautiful “shun” design. Due to its 8-inch size, it’s very comfortable to hold.

This knife’s design is unmatched, thanks to its traditional Japanese PP/TPE blend handle and VG10 san Mai cutting core. It has a 16-degree hand-sharpened double-bevel blade.

For those who are skeptical about the value of the Shun Sora brand, this is the greatest Japanese chef knife under $100 that comes packaged with a Shun.

Misono Molybdenum Steel Series Gyuto (210mm)

Japanese knife maker Misono is well-known and highly respected among professional chefs all around the world. Known for its tight quality control and 100% in-house knife production, they are a household name. Due to their unique design, Misono knives tend to be on the pricier side (usually costing well over $100). The Misono Molybdenum Steel Series Gyuto is the only chef’s knife that costs less than $100.

With a Molybdenum Vanadium Stainless Steel (AUS-8) blade, this knife’s blade delivers great longevity and sharpness, as well as being easy to resharpen when necessary (HRC 57).

This Misono knife, like the Fujiwara FKM, has an edge bevel of 70/30 for right-handed users only. There are certain retailers that allow you to order a left-handed variant, but it will cost you 10-15 percent more.

Two rivets secure the characteristic pakkawood handle in Western style (or three if larger blade size). For everyday usage, it is waterproof and long-lasting.

In addition to being extremely light, the Molybdenum Gyuto from Misono is extremely sharp out of the box (156g / 5.5oz). It’s hard to think of anything negative about this knife, and it’s one of the greatest Japanese chef knives in this price range. When it comes to buying your first Japanese kitchen knife, it’s always best to go with a well-known brand like Misono.

The 21cm (8.2′′) variant is presently selling for approximately $85 at retail. If you’re looking for a more affordable option, you can have it in a shorter length (180mm – 360mm).

Hanzo Chef Knife Professional Knives -Best steel for chef knife

Are you fed up with spending money on knives only to have to sharpen and clean them later? That’s no longer an issue, thanks to the 8-inch Hanzo Chef Knife from the Katana series. You’ll never have to worry about your knives rusting again because to their remarkable edge retention.

It includes 67 extra layers of stainless steel on top of the already-stainless steel blade.

Cutting meat or vegetables with this knife is effortless because it doesn’t display any resistance. When it comes to cutting, chefs are in love with this knife since it is so easy to grip and provides a constant cutting sensation.

You may even cut with your eyes closed thanks to the anti-slip safety function incorporated to the blade. It’s a great way to show off your culinary prowess while having a lot of fun. The Hanzo chef knife is the best in every way, in my opinion.

Professional Gyuto Kitchen Chefs Knife – Best Traditional knife for beef cut

Utilize this high-quality traditional Japanese professional Gyuto Kitchen Chefs Knife to transform even the most flawed dishes into masterpieces. If you want to make the best steaks, chops, sushi and wagyu, this is the knife for you. You’ll see this knife in every steakhouse you go to because it cuts through even the toughest cuts of meat with ease.

It’s a must-have if you’re a meat-eating vegetarian or vegan. Rather than relying on eateries for your meat slicing needs, why not make it yourself at home?

With a full tang construction and a 30-degree honed edge, the Gyuto Kitchen Chefs knife is an excellent addition to any kitchen. The blades are made of 420HC stainless steel, which means they won’t rust. It is heat-treated so that the edge retains its sharpness for a long time.

A single bevel traditional Japanese style rosewood handle gives the knife a firm yet comfortable hold. This knife’s blade was utilized by the majority of traditional chefs.

Kai 6720c Wasabi Black Chef’s Knife – Best Japanese knife for Multipurpose

Kai has been working tirelessly for years to become one of the top knife-making firms. Throughout the company’s 110-year history, Kai 6720c has set a new standard for customer satisfaction. These Japanese chef knives were used by the majority of the cooks.

In the absence of frequent sharpening, what else do you need?

Slicing and dicing, chopping and boning can all be done with just one knife. The act of mincing and dicing. To meet all of your needs, this multi-purpose knife was thoughtfully crafted. If you’re looking for something that can handle most of your basic culinary tasks, this one is a great option.

 Japanese Damascus Steel Chef Knife- Best Magnet holder knife

Despite its inexpensive price, the Japanese Damascus Steel Chef Knife by Great Goods has received a high percentage of 5-star reviews from customers. This knife’s balance is outstanding, yet it may be difficult for certain beginners to master.

Do not fear! Cutting, slicing, and chopping anything that comes between the knife and the cutting board will be your new favorite pastime.

Incredible balance on the index finger sets the rhythm for your cutting motion thanks to the unique design. If you want to have some fun, don’t be scared to go fast and furious with this knife.

Final verdicts

Japanese knives are expensive, so finding one for less than $100 is definitely a blessing. With the information above about the best Japanese knives for your budget, you’ll be able to get all the fancy kitchen knives you’ve always wanted. Every time you look for a knife, make sure you know what to look for.

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